Wednesday, February 12, 2020

Statement Personal Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 500 words - 1

Personal Statement Example Since it is known to have a great track, as well as a real football field, it has even featured on an album cover that was of Running with Scissors. Santa Monica College is also well known to have a public radio station that broadcasts all over Los Angeles with over 450,000 listeners, and its newspaper that is available both in print and online as well. It goes by the name The Corsair and has taken several awards over the time as well as the award for General Excellence. Having all of this information in mind, it would be wise to join Santa Monica College and major in Marketing and Engineering. It would be an honor to study in an institution that is known to bring out very talented actors and actresses, as well as great men and women in the society. Santa Monica College also has number one transfers to higher institutions. These include the University of Southern California, Loyola Marymount University and the University of California. Getting a transfer to the University of Southern California would be a great choice for me. Santa Monica Junior College has transfers to these kinds of universities because it is also known to produce individuals of substance. The Western Association of Schools and Colleges accredits this institution for being such a great college. It is a great institution where all kinds of students from all walks of life and from whichever race whether Asian, White, Black or Hispanic can school in without any stress or disturbance. These are among the many reasons why Santa Monica College would be an ideal school to enroll in once one completes their high school education. It has good and trained professional tutors who mostly also happen to have schooled in the same institution. These lecturers are of high value and guarantee professionalism. One could never go wrong when it comes to choosing Santa Monica Junior College as their college of choice. Aside from

Friday, January 31, 2020

Astronomy assignment Essay Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 500 words

Astronomy assignment - Essay Example It is a fact that moon does not produce its own light but only acts as a reflector of the sun’s lights. One can observe different parts of illuminated moon by the sun as it moves around the sun. This is the reason why the moon changes its shape in time and regularly. This observations where moon changes its shape in time is called the phases of the moon. As the moon moves around the earth, its one side is illuminated and changes in time from dark to fully lit and henceforth. When the moon is fully lit, it’s said to be in lunar phase (Pamela, 1996, Web) where one observes a full moon on the side facing the earth. This phase only appears when the earth positions itself between the sun and the moon where the moon reflects the lights of the sun directly to the earth. The moon the enters the quarter moon phase in about a week later and is seen as half since the visible lit portion is half by somebody on earth. When the moon moves between the earth and sun, one observing it from the earth sees a complete dark surface since at this time it’s reflecting the lights back to the sun. The complete darkness is seen at different parts since the moon itself is not transparent and blocks the lights from the sun. Although some of the lights surpasses it and directly hit the earth as the moon is smaller than the size in terms of size. This occurrences is called the new moon phase. Before and after the quarter phases of the moon, there are crescent and gibbous phases. In crescent phase, the moon surface as reflected on earth is less than half lit. Whilst in gibbous phase, the moon surface viewed on earth is more that half, but not full lit. The moon’s revolution around the earth makes it to appear like it is changing its shape. But the fact is that, it is caused by the different angles by which, it is observed on its lit-surfaced side. As

Thursday, January 23, 2020

consumerism :: essays research papers fc

  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  There is enough food for every person on earth to consume 2500 calories a day, not including fruit or roots. It is odd that despite this fact there is still an overwhelming level of poverty in the world. The wealthiest 20% of the world receive most of the food in the world and spend huge amounts of money to purchase all this food. In order for the elite to live at the standard it does, the majority of the world must go without. Millions starve because the elite prefer death of the hungry to their own inconvenience. This situation is not easily remedied. First, people must begin to understand that they must eat only as much food as they need. Many would argue that they never have any leftovers and that all the food in their house gets eaten with little thrown away. This is good in the sense that food itself is not being wasted, but every American doesn’t need to eat as much food as they do. When a high percentage of people in this country are overweight and most people in third world countries are ghastly underweight and undernourished, then it is apparent that the citizens of this country must consume much less food. After understanding the issue at hand, Americans must then stop eating three to four meals a day and stop stuffing themselves at every meal. This would be hard to accomplish because this would mean making a sacrifice, which the rich already have big problems with, but also because the food-producing corporations would do everything in their power to stop this from happening. There is no market for these corporations in small third-world countries where they may have to sell their products at lower prices and no longer make astronomical profits.   Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  On an anti-consumerism website, these chilling statistics are given to show that America and the world’s richest are destroying our planet rapidly. â€Å"The United States, which has 6% of the world's population, uses 30% of the world's energy supply. 20% of the worlds population, (in other words its wealthy consumer class), is responsible for over 50% of its 'greenhouse effect' atmospheric pollutants, 90% of its ozone-depleting CFC gases, 96% of its radioactive waste... and so on â€Å"(enviroweb.org). Many may say that the reason for these embarrassing statistics is because the United States is the largest industrialized nation in the world. consumerism :: essays research papers fc   Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  There is enough food for every person on earth to consume 2500 calories a day, not including fruit or roots. It is odd that despite this fact there is still an overwhelming level of poverty in the world. The wealthiest 20% of the world receive most of the food in the world and spend huge amounts of money to purchase all this food. In order for the elite to live at the standard it does, the majority of the world must go without. Millions starve because the elite prefer death of the hungry to their own inconvenience. This situation is not easily remedied. First, people must begin to understand that they must eat only as much food as they need. Many would argue that they never have any leftovers and that all the food in their house gets eaten with little thrown away. This is good in the sense that food itself is not being wasted, but every American doesn’t need to eat as much food as they do. When a high percentage of people in this country are overweight and most people in third world countries are ghastly underweight and undernourished, then it is apparent that the citizens of this country must consume much less food. After understanding the issue at hand, Americans must then stop eating three to four meals a day and stop stuffing themselves at every meal. This would be hard to accomplish because this would mean making a sacrifice, which the rich already have big problems with, but also because the food-producing corporations would do everything in their power to stop this from happening. There is no market for these corporations in small third-world countries where they may have to sell their products at lower prices and no longer make astronomical profits.   Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  On an anti-consumerism website, these chilling statistics are given to show that America and the world’s richest are destroying our planet rapidly. â€Å"The United States, which has 6% of the world's population, uses 30% of the world's energy supply. 20% of the worlds population, (in other words its wealthy consumer class), is responsible for over 50% of its 'greenhouse effect' atmospheric pollutants, 90% of its ozone-depleting CFC gases, 96% of its radioactive waste... and so on â€Å"(enviroweb.org). Many may say that the reason for these embarrassing statistics is because the United States is the largest industrialized nation in the world.

Wednesday, January 15, 2020

When Small Means Big: The Impact of Nanotechnology

A revolution in science and technology, which will significantly impact our daily lives, is looming in the horizon. The scientific community is now excited by changes that could be brought about by the multidisciplinary discipline of nanoscience and nanotechnology, which is comprehensively defined asâ€Å"[r]esearch and technology development at the atomic, molecular, or macromolecular levels, in the length of approximately 1–100 nm range, to provide a fundamental understanding of phenomena and materials at the nanoscale, and to create and use structures, devices, and systems that have novel properties and functions because of their small size. The novel and differentiating properties and functions are developed at a critical length scale of matter typically under 100 nm.Nanotechnology research and development includes integration of nanoscale structure into larger material components, systems, and architectures. Within these larger scale assemblies, the control and construct ion of their structures and component devices remain at the nanoscale†. (National Research Council 2002, cited in Dreher 2004).Although technically encompassing any device measuring at least 1,000 nanometers—a nanometer (from Greek ‘nano’, meaning dwarf) is one-billionth of a meter (The Royal Society & The Royal Academy of Engineering 2004)—much of the work being done presently focuses on materials smaller than 100 nm (Gupta et al 2003) since it is at this level that materials exhibit unique physical and chemical properties that can be harvested to convey improvements to engineered materials (i.e. enhanced magnetic properties, better electrical and optical activity, and superior structural integrity) (Thomas & Sayre 2005).Ralph Merkle, as cited by Gupta et al (2003), noted that atomic configuration, to an extent, determines physical and chemical characteristics of materials, using as examples carbon in diamond, or silica from sand. From this perspect ive, the manufacturing techniques we are using today appear crude since we are moving molecules by heaps and mounds, and, therefore, are manufacturing devices that could still be improved for accuracy and precision (Gupta et al 2003). Nanotechnology, according to Gupta et al, aims to explore and exploit the possibility of designing at the molecular and atomic levels, and producing a generation of novel products that boast of greater strength, lighter weight and better precision (2003).Technically nanotechnology is not something new. Ball (2003) notes that nanoscale devices have been, and are currently being, utilized by organisms in their daily functioning. He cites, for instance, the proteins that serve as motors to flagella of motile bacteria, as readers and interpreters of the genetic code, or as miniature solar panels in plants that gather sunlight for photosynthesis (Ball 2003). The possibility of harnessing this potential within the environment and put them to practical use ha s been floated in the scientific community as early as the 1940s, when von Neumann forwarded the idea of manufacturing systems or machines that are capable of self-replication, which could potentially lower production costs (Gupta et al 2003).Richard Feynman in 1959, in an address to the American Physical Society entitled ‘There Is Plenty of Room at the Bottom’, advanced the possibility that, similar to what we are doing at the macroscopic scale, we could maneuver atoms to where we want them to be, and produce materials that would solve the problem of manufacture and reproduction (Buxton et al 2003; Gupta P et al 2003). In 1986, K Eric Drexler provided a picture of nanotechnological use in the future in his book Engines of Creation, where humans are utilizing self-replicating nanoscale robots in daily life processes (Ball 2003).The move from the drawing board to actual application, however, has been very recent—as evidenced by the relatively few nanotechnology pr oducts—fuelled by theoretical and laboratory progress which showed that, indeed, systems can be built from molecules and atoms maneuvered at the microscopic scale (Gupta et al 2003). L’Oreal recently introduced in the market sun creams that contain nano-sized grains of titanium dioxide, which absorbs ultraviolet light, but without the ‘smeared chalk’ appearance of regular creams (Ball 2003). This same technology, according to Ball (2003) was taken a step further when it was found that titanium dioxide particles become reactive when exposed to ultraviolet light, leading to the development of self-cleaning tiles and glasses—titanium-coated tiles and glasses that use the sun’s energy to burn up dirt stuck to their surfaces. In the filed of medicine, nanotechnology is currently being utilized with state-of-the-art technology to combat genetic diseases (Dunkley 2004).In addition to these, researches are currently undergoing, exploring the various possible applications of nanotechnology in various fields. For instance, in the medical sciences, the development of nanorobots could aid in precise, and rapid, cellular repair and regeneration, delivery of drugs at the site where it is needed, destruction of cancerous cells, or unblocking of clogged blood vessels (Dunkley 2004). The capacity to detect disease through alterations in body chemistry or physiology is also a possibility through nanotubes or nanowires coated with detector molecules (Buxton et al 2003). Molecular imaging, according to Buxton et al (2003) will also provide us with a view of the human body beyond gross anatomic structures, since this would utilize molecules that would home to tissues affected by specific disease processes. Environmental problems we face today, such as air pollution or oil spills, could be remedied through nanorobots designed to clean these toxic elements from the air we breath or the water we drink (Dunkley 2004).The material sciences will also significantly benefit from nanotechnology, with the promise of development of stronger and lighter plastics, computers with faster processors and increased memory storage, ion storage for batteries (which will improve performance), quick-charging battery cars, and fuel cells for motor-driven devices that are environment-friendly and energy efficient (Gupta et al 2003). Perhaps a bit too far in the future, Dunkley even forwards the idea that it might be possible, with nanorobots moving atoms and molecules, for us to create common and everyday things from our own backyard, moving manufacturing to the domain of the household with a wheelbarrow and a shovel (2004).Because of the great promise held by nanotechnology, governments worldwide are investing in nanoresearch, to further refine our understanding of this small world. Global investment in nanotechnology has been estimated to be â‚ ¬5 billion, according to the Royal Society and the Royal Academy of Engineering (2004). The E uropean Union pledged to spend â‚ ¬1 billion (Ball 2003), whereas Japan allocated $800M in 2003 (The Royal Society & The Royal Academy of Engineering 2004). The United States is willing to spend nearly $3.7 billion for nanotechnology from 2005 to 2008, with nearly $500 million allocated for research funding (Dunkley 2004; The Royal Society & The Royal Academy of Engineering 2004; Thomas & Sayre 2005).The considerable change nanotechnology can bring, as well as the huge sums of money governments worldwide are currently spending to make this a reality, has sparked some questions from various sectors on the impact of nanotechnologies, not only to the scientific fields to which it will be applied, but to the society in general. In the biological sciences, for instance, the primary concern is the possible toxicity exposure—and chronic exposure, at that—to nanoparticles can bring about, since these materials have the capability of interacting with cells and cellular organ elles, and hence, alter body physiology (Ball 2003; The Royal Society & The Royal Academy of Engineering 2004).Dreher (2004), and Thomas and Sayre (2005) have recently reviewed the evidence on the health impact of nanotechnology exposure, and found that there is a paucity of evidence to encourage or preclude use of nanotechnologies in humans pending full investigations and detailed evidence supporting or debunking the same. Ball (2003) notes that, in the same way as new drugs or devices, nanotechnology must be viewed as a potential health hazard unless proven otherwise. Large scale production in the future would necessitate hazard-testing and human exposure assessment, to minimize risks (The Royal Society & The Royal Academy of Engineering 2004).The significant economic impact of nanotechnologies, according to experts, may not be felt in the short-term, although this must be viewed with caution, since it is entirely difficult to predict what impact a developing technology that has n ot yet realized its full potential will have (The Royal Society & The Royal Academy of Engineering 2004). The differing capacities of developed, developing and underdeveloped countries to participate in the nanotechnology race has also raised concerns that it might intensify the economic gap between these nations, leading to what is referred to as a ‘nanodivide’ (The Royal Society & The Royal Academy of Engineering 2004). Finally, patenting of nanotechnology—which is advantageous since it would, though economic incentive, encourage other individuals to contribute to scientific progress—may stifle creativity or innovation when a broad one is granted (The Royal Society & The Royal Academy of Engineering 2004).Another area of concern is military and defense capability. The development of new devices—pervasive sensors, improved clothing and armor, and enhanced information and communication exchange—could be viewed both as opportunities and threat s, depending on who uses them, and how they are used (The Royal Society & The Royal Academy of Engineering 2004). But more than this, the Royal Society (2004) cautions that the secrecy coupled with development of technologies for defense use might fuel public distrust, and heighten the understanding that nanotechnology is being developed primarily, if not entirely, for military ends.Ethical issues pervading the socio-cultural impact of nanotechnologies are also a concern. For instance, development of new nanodevices may cause a significant change in employment patterns, role perception, education patterns, and eventually family life (Dunkley 2004). The end result, still according to Dunkley (2004) would be a shift in our present definition of inequality, poverty, and class, and finally, the way we construe society in general.If what Dunkley predicted would come true (i.e. manufacturing at our own backyard), then the capacity to produce would be entirely dependent on having the neces sary resources for this production, which brings to fore the concern of concentration of the harvests of nanotechnology in the hands of a few. Although nanomanufacturing could present the solution to hunger and homelessness, the question remains whether it will alter our perception of the material world where we move (Dunkley 2004).The possibility of devices being used to store personal information, although enhancing personal security on the one hand, also raises the possibility of violation of civil liberties, especially when collection and distribution of the same is made without the consent of the person involved, or access to these information could be limited to the hands of the few who could develop and control personal information databases or systems (The Royal Society & The Royal Academy of Engineering 2004).Finally, the possibility of radical human enhancement, or the creation of humans in the future, through nanotechnology (in conjunction with biotechnology and informati on technology), though a remote possibility, still carries with it the burden of resolving whether these creations are really human, and whether they also possess souls like we do (Dunkley 2004). In the same vein, this new capability would radically change, if not totally abolish, our perception of religion and morality (The Royal Society & The Royal Academy of Engineering 2004). On a lesser plane, the possibility of nanotechnology extending human longevity to hundreds of years will definitely alter our view of aging and death (Dunkley 2004).What, then, lies in store for us in the future with nanotechnology? Actually, no one can tell, since nanotechnology is but a frontier—which, to Melbin is a pattern of sparse settlement in space or time—or what Dunkley (2004) describes as relatively ‘unsettled and a wilderness waiting to be discovered’. Until such time, therefore, that the full potential of nanotechnology has been realized, or at least understood throug h research, we may endlessly speculate about how nanotechnology will affect our daily lives and society in general, who will benefit from its, what and capabilities will it provide us. The concerns, however, raised in this paper are valid considerations of the impact the future application of nanotechnologies will have, and this necessitates caution and vigilance on the part of all stakeholders.ReferencesBall P, 2003 (23 Jun), ‘Nanotechnology Science's Next Frontier or Just a Load of Bull?’, New Statesman, vol. 132, no. 4643, pp. 30-31.Buxton DB, Lee SC, Wickline SA, Ferrari M & for the Working Group Members, 2003 (02 Dec), ‘Recommendations of the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Nanotechnology Working Group’, Circulation, vol. 108, pp. 2737-2742.Dreher KL, 2004, ‘Health and environmental impact of nanotechnology: Toxicological assessment of manufactured nanoparticles’, Toxicological Sciences, vol. 77, pp. 3–5.Dunkley RWS, 2004, ‘Nanotechnology: Social Consequences and Future Implications’, Futures, vol. 36, no. 10, pp. 1129-1132.Gupta P, Malhotra R, Segal MA & Verhaeren MYFJ, 2003, ‘Recent trends in nanotechnology’, in R Gulati, A Paoni & M Sawhney (eds), Kellogg on Technology & Innovation, Wiley, Hoboken, NJ, pp. 261-283.The Royal Society & The Royal Academy of Engineering, 2004, Nanoscience and nanotechnologies: opportunities and uncertainties, The Royal Society & The Royal Academy of Engineering, London.Thomas K & Sayre P, 2005, ‘Research strategies for safety evaluation of nanomaterials, Part I: Evaluating the human health implications of exposure to nanoscale materials’, Toxicological Sciences, vol. 87, no. 2, pp. 316–321.

Tuesday, January 7, 2020

Writing to Friends and Family in French

Writing letters in French can be somewhat tricky because they require particular opening and closing conventions. Following some basic rules of French etiquette and grammar will help you find the correct expressions to use when writing to family, friends, or acquaintances. Following Conventions For personal correspondence, there are two important conventions in French letters: greetings and closings. The expressions you use depend on your relationship with the person you are writing to, particularly whether you know her personally. Also, consider whether to use  tu  or  vous—tu  is the familiar you,  while vous  is the formal greeting for you in French. Remember that these  French expressions do not always translate well into English. These are usable equivalents, rather than literal translations. Following are possible greetings and closings you can use, depending on whether you know the person. Greetings You can use these greetings either by themselves or with the salutation followed by the persons name. The greeting in French is listed on the left, while the English translation is on the right. French greetings can be particularly tricky. For example, the French title  Mademoiselle—literally my young lady—has long been used to distinguish between women, whether due to their age or marital status. Shopkeepers and bank clerks always greet female customers with a  polite  Bonjour, Mademoiselle  or  Bonjour, Madame. But in a letter, you have to assess  the womans age in order to choose the correct term, and that can prove challenging. You Do Not Know the Person​ MonsieurMonsieur xxx SirMr. xxx MadameMadame xxx Mrs. xxx MademoiselleMademoiselle xxx MissMiss xxx Messieurs Sirs You Do Know the Person​ Cher MonsieurCher Monsieur xxx Dear SirDear Mr. xxx Chre MadameChre Madame xxx Dear Mrs. xxx Chre MademoiselleChre Mademoiselle xxx Dear MissDear Miss xxx Chers amis Dear friends Chers Luc et Anne Dear Luc and Anne Chers grandsparents Dear Grandparents Mon cher Paul My dear Paul Mes chers amis My dear friends Ma trs chre Lise My dearest Lise Closings Closings in French letters can also be tricky, even in personal missives. To help you craft your closing correctly, the following chart uses the same conventions as the previous one: The closing is listed in French on the left, while the translation is on the right. To an Acquaintance​ Je vous envoie mes bien amicales penses Best wishes Recevez, je vous prie, mes meilleures amitis Yours sincerely Je vous adresse mon trs amical souvenir Kindest regards   To a FriendCordialement (à   vous)Sincerely (yours)Votre ami dà ©vouà ©(e)Your devoted friendChaleureusementWith warm regardsBien  amicalementIn friendshipAmitià ©sBest wishes, Your friendBien des choses à   tousBest wishes to allBien à   vous, Bien à   toiBest wishesÀ bientà ´t!See you soon!Je tembrasseLove / With loveBons  baisersLots of loveBises!Hugs and kissesGrosses bises!Lots of hugs and kisses Considerations These latter expressions—such as Bons  baisers  (Lots of love) and Bises! (Hugs and kisses)—might seem too informal in English. But, such closings are not necessarily romantic in French; you can use them with friends of the same or opposite sex.

Monday, December 30, 2019

Drug Dependence And Addiction Drugs - 1231 Words

It is an obvious assumption that drugs have an effect on the mind, but what exactly goes on and how do these substances affect your brain and change your state of consciousness? This is the question that interested me and brought me to want to write about this certain topic. Drugs alter the way people think, feel, and behave by disrupting neurotransmission, the process of communication between brain cells. Over the past few decades, studies have established that drug dependence and addiction are features of an organic brain disease caused by drugs overall impacts on neurotransmission. For example, the neurotransmitter dopamine, which controls the pleasure and reward, movement, attention, and memory functions of the brain, are affected by drugs such as Cocaine, Methamphetamine, and Amphetamine. Virtually all drugs of abuse directly or indirectly increase dopamine in the reward pathway. A person s experiences when abusing a drug reflect the functional roles of the particular neurotran smitter whose activity it disrupts. Scientists continue to build on this basic understanding with experiments to further explain the physiological bases for drug abuse vulnerability as well as the full dimensions and progression of the disease. The findings provide strong leads to new medications and behavioral treatments. Drugs of abuse, such as methamphetamine and heroine, affect the brain much more dramatically than natural rewards, such as food and social interactions. To bringShow MoreRelatedDrug Dependence And Addiction : Drugs1231 Words   |  5 Pagesobvious assumption that drugs have an effect on the mind, but what exactly goes on and how do these substances affect your brain and change your state of consciousness? This is the question that interested me and brought me to want to write about this certain topic. Drugs alter the way people think, feel, and behave by disrupting neurotransmission, the process of communication between brain cells. Over the past few decades, studies have established that drug dependence and addiction are features of anRead MoreDrugs -Tolerance,Dependence,Addiction and Treatment1184 Words   |  5 PagesDrugs -Tolerance,Dependence,Addiction and Treatment. There can be a great deal of confusion surrounding the words addiction, physical dependence, and tolerance. People will use these words as if they are referring to the exact thing, but there is a significant difference between them . Misunderstandings about these terms can not only be confusing for the general public but also many in the medical profession. One of the main culprits blamed for this confusion is the fact that the Diagnostic andRead MoreDiscuss the Importance and Interplay of Social, Psychological and Biological Factors in the Course of Heroin Addiction. What Therapeutic Approaches Can Be Used to Treat This Form of Drug Dependence?1583 Words   |  7 PagesDiscuss the importance and interplay of social, psychological and biological factors in the course of heroin addiction. What therapeutic approaches can be used to treat this form of drug dependence? Heroin exerts its main effects through psychological mechanisms of action, the user feels a sense of great warmth and well-being and views the world with greatly reduced anxiety and emotional distress. These feelings last for a relatively short period of time of around 4-6 hours. With repeated useRead MoreLove Is a Natural Drug1415 Words   |  6 PagesLove Is a Natural Drug John-Mark I. Chambers The University of the West Indies Mona Campus Abstract Love addiction and substance dependence have similar characteristics, namely, the release of the neurotransmitter dopamine, the presence of tolerance and withdrawal symptoms, and the negative influences they have on a person’s life. 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The nature-based view is that expression of addiction (phenotype) is based upon genetic predisposition (genotype). Numerous genetic studies on pedigree have been conducted over the years. The majority of the results of these studies indicate that monozygotic twins have higher concordance of addiction than dizygotic twins. More specificallyRead MoreDrug Addiction And Its Effect On The Reward Circuit1207 Words   |  5 Pagesthe reward circuit is examined. Specifically, the association of drug addiction, as a result of stimulants, in response to increased levels of dopamine. I will begin by examining what defines an addiction, and what factors influence an individual to become drug dependent, as a result of abuse. I will be focusing on the reinforcing properties of the drug as well as, physical dependence, psychological dependence, social factors, drug availability and furthermore, the vulnerability of the individual

Saturday, December 21, 2019

How Security Is Important For Education And Healthcare For...

Security is most highest priority in every country but To nurture a secure nation, federal spending must be balanced among military defense and programs that provide economic security, such as education and health care . A worthy portion of any country s budget is spent on defence . To some extent it is not a good idea for us to spend money on defending ourselves from imaginary enemies. We spend significant sums of money preparing for wars that we later create and ignore the needs of our own country. There are also other important sectors which needs to develop to bring economic growth. It should be much better to spent in areas such as social welfare, health, and education. We do not need such a massive, sprawling military policing for the entire world to be safe.. There should be equivalent expenditure on military and wars as well as on education and healthcare for the development of country. Firstly, The primary reason countries carry out military expenditure is to acquire military capability of one sort or other. A country without a strong military is witness and might attached by enemies and terrorists. Terrorist threat is the one of the reason for allocation most budget in military. Although, having a big military and high tech technology weapons causes countries ready for start a war. Higher government spending creates higher economic output,provided it was military spending. Most people would acknowledgeShow MoreRelatedU.s. Military Defense And Education1737 Words   |  7 PagesSecurity is most highest priority in every country but To nurture a secure nation, federal spending must be balanced among military defense and programs that provide economic security, such as education and health care . A worthy portion of any country s budget is spent on defence . To some extent it is not a good idea for us to spend money on defending ourselves from imaginary enemies. 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